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Macro or Micro?



We all are familiar with micro-managers and you may have worked for one or two throughout our careers. However, macro-managers are on the other end of the scale and they come with a different set of workplace challenges. Macro-managers are those managers, who are seldom around when you need them. Their ideal environment is when they can manage employees, who are self-starters, independent high-performers and self-motivated. So, would you rather work for a micro-manager or a macro-manager? If you want to work for a macro-manager, here are some things you may want to consider: Frequent meetings. It may be beneficial to ensure that meetings are held on a consistent basis, so that you can retain open communications with your macro-manager. It’s important that the two of you maintain effective communications, so that both of you can stay abreast of what’s going on. Email updates. Most macro-managers consider inquiries to be an intrusion to their workday, so keep your manager informed by forwarding brief, but high-level updates and briefings on your job tasks that impact the organizational goals of the company. Most of all, keep your manager informed of potential problems, so that he/she will not get sideswiped or caught by surprise. Realistic expectations. Make sure you have realistic expectations of your macro-manager and of yourself. It’s unlikely that you will receive timely feedback or be recognized for your accomplishments. Therefore, it will be incumbent upon you to look for signs of appreciation that indicate that your manager is pleased with your performance. Also, learn to listen to what he/she is not saying, because it may give you a sound barometer. Good luck and enjoy this unique managerial experience. PM

Macro-managers are those managers, who are seldom around when you need them. Their ideal environment is when they can manage employees, who are self-starters, independent high-performers and self-motivated. So, would you rather work for a micro-manager or a macro-manager? If you want to work for a macro-manager, here are some things you may want to consider: Frequent meetings. It may be beneficial to ensure that meetings are held on a consistent basis, so that you can retain open communications with your macro-manager. It’s important that the two of you maintain effective communications, so that both of you can stay abreast of what’s going on. Email updates. Most macro-managers consider inquiries to be an intrusion to their workday, so keep your manager informed by forwarding brief, but high-level updates and briefings on your job tasks that impact the organizational goals of the com

pany. Most of all, keep your manager informed of potential problems, so that he/she will not get sideswiped or caught by surprise. Realistic expectations. Make sure you have realistic expectations of your macro-manager and of yourself. It’s unlikely that you will receive timely feedback or be recognized for your accomplishments. Therefore, it will be incumbent upon you to look for signs of appreciation that indicate that your manager is pleased with your performance. Also, learn to listen to what he/she is not saying, because it may give you a sound barometer. Good luck and enjoy this unique managerial experience. PM


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Paula Maddox

Coach | Author | Speaker | Minister | Doctoral Student

Tel: 404.939.7432   

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